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April 29, 2013

Brian David Johnson On Changing The Story of The Future




 
Futurism
The future is Brian David Johnson's business. As a futurist at Intel Corporation, his charter is to develop an actionable vision for computing in 2020. His work is called "future casting"—using ethnographic field studies, technology research, trend data, and even science fiction to provide Intel with a pragmatic vision of consumers and computing.






As the resident futurist at Intel, Brian David Johnson's charter is to develop an actionable vision for computing in 2020.

His work is called "future casting"—using ethnographic field studies, technology research, trend data, and even science fiction to provide Intel with a pragmatic vision of consumers and computing.

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Along with reinventing TV, Johnson has been pioneering development in artificial intelligence, robotics, and using science fiction as a design tool. He speaks and writes extensively about future technologies in articles and scientific papers as well as science fiction short stories and novels. He has directed two feature films and is an illustrator and commissioned painter.

In Johnson's Science Fiction Prototyping, he writes that if you are interested in science or fascinated with the future then science fiction is where you explore new ideas and let your dreams and nightmares duke it out on the safety of the page or screen.

Along with Boing Boing's Cory Doctorow, Johnson came up with a strategy for addressing futurism: Change the story people tell themselves about the future they will live in.

In his latest book, Vintage Tomorrows, Johnson and he world cultural historian James Carrott explore steampunk, a cultural movement that’s captivated thousands of artists, designers, makers, hackers, and writers throughout the world.

Steampunk Ironman

Just like today, the late 19th century was an age of rapid technological change, and writers such as Jules Verne and H.G. Wells commented on their time with fantastic stories that jumpstarted science fiction. Through interviews with experts such as William Gibson, Cory Doctorow, Bruce Sterling, James Gleick, and Margaret Atwood, this book looks into steampunk’s vision of old-world craftsmen making beautiful hand-tooled gadgets, and what it says about our age of disposable technology.


Steampunk is everywhere—as gadget prototypes at Maker Faire, novels and comic books, paintings and photography, sculptures, fashion design, and music. This elaborate view of a history that never existed can help us reimagine our future.


SOURCE  TEDx Talks

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