6 Things to Know Before Buying a Puppy

There’s no denying puppies are adorable. These cute little bundles of fur can bring a lot of joy into your life but they also require a lot of work.

Whether you’re in the market for an American-Akita or a German shepherd, it’s worth remembering that buying a puppy is a big commitment and a decision that should not be taken lightly. In this article, we’ll explore some of the things you should consider before bringing home a puppy.


House Training

House Training

Unlike an adult dog, a puppy will need to learn the basics from you, and training it will require patience and persistence. Your puppy may be excitable and unruly before it is properly house-trained. It may scratch your furniture, chew your slippers, bark at your guests, and will require a great deal of your discipline at the beginning.

While it is still being toilet-trained, your puppy will have accidents around the house that could stain the furniture and cause damage to floors, so you will have to clean up any accidents as quickly as possible. It may be worth buying some dog diapers to prevent such incidents from happening until your puppy knows where it should go.

Since puppies usually need to be taken outside to eliminate after eating and drinking, you will also need to take your dog for frequent toilet breaks. All of this can be hard work and will require a significant investment of your time, however, the rewards will be worth it.


Costs

Costs

The cost of buying a puppy will vary depending on its breed. Aside from the initial purchase price, however, there are many ancillary costs that can add up over the year. In addition to food, leashes, toys, and grooming costs there will be routine expenses such as health checks, dental care, vaccinations, and medications.

Monitoring your dog's health is important. Occasionally, dogs will experience digestive problems such as diarrhea, and may sometimes find yourself asking why my dog has diarrhea but is acting fine? If you observe unusual behaviors, a visit to a vet is advisable.

Veterinary bills can be expensive, depending on the treatment your puppy requires, so pet insurance is advisable.


Time Investment

Time Investment

Most dogs will require at least two to three hours of your day and with a puppy, this could be much higher. From house training, regular walks, and initial veterinary appointments you will need to devote a significant amount of time to your new pet.

As it is yet untrained, if left on its own for too long it could cause damage to your furniture, hurt itself, and feel anxious and alone.

Consider who will look after your puppy when you are at work or if you are traveling. Is there someone who has agreed to take care of it when you are busy or are there dog daycare facilities nearby?


Living Space

Living Space

As well as your lifestyle, finding your ideal puppy should also match your living space. You should take into consideration a puppy’s size and energy levels before bringing it into your home.

Make an honest assessment of how much room you can give to your new pet. Remember that a puppy can grow to its full size in a relatively short space of time, so do your research on the breed of dog you are thinking of buying.

Puppies are energetic and may need a lot of space to run around. Does your home have a backyard where you can let your puppy exercise, or is there a green space nearby where you will take it for regular walks?


Puppy Proofing

Puppy Proofing

Do not underestimate how much damage a puppy can do. Puppies are energetic, curious, and at times, mischievous. They like to explore their environment and will often chew or eat their way through your furniture, shoes, clothing, and anything else that they can get their teeth on. With all of this destruction awaiting you make sure you have prepared your home for the arrival of your new pet.

Puppy-proofing your home is essential so consider taking the following steps:

  • Baby-gates: Try to keep your puppy in an area that is easy to clean up if it has any accidents. A vinyl floor, such as in the kitchen, is preferable to a carpet.
  • Electrical items: Keep all cords and chargers out of your dog’s reach as it could easily chew on them and possibly choke.
  • Child safety locks: Add these to cabinets that your dog could easily access, especially those that contain harmful or toxic items such as bleach or laundry detergent.
  • Spray furniture: Spray your furniture with anti-chew spray. A non-toxic spray containing ingredients such as apple cider vinegar will act as a deterrent to your dog chewing on your furniture.

Accessories

Accessories

Make your home ready for your new addition by stocking up on essentials such as dog food and treats. High-quality and holistic food such as Earthborn Holistic puppy food is a healthy option for your pet. Other items you will need include: making high-quality, holistic pet food

  • Dog bed
  • ID tags and a collar
  • Leash
  • Grooming items
  • Food and water bowls
  • Chew toys

The six areas highlighted in this article will help you decide whether a puppy is the right choice for you and prepare you to go ahead with that choice successfully.


How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 0 / 5. Vote count: 0

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.